Decorating the Entry Hall Tables

Sep 17th

Entry hall tables – Decorating fold up as tables for events can be an extraordinary challenge as adding elegance to seating arrangements that most people connect with the seventh grade may require a bit of foresight. Even with a low budget, however, a creative touch can go a long way to living your tables. Keep some basic tips in mind, but let your own artistic flair shine through. Your guests will spend the evening too busy discussing your amazing table setting to even think junior high.

The Entry Hall Tables
The Entry Hall Tables

Cover stools or benches. Round plastic stools or long benches on like entry hall tables are an immediate reminder of a less elegant past. For stools, draw a square of cloth 3 feet of 3 feet work well over the seat and loosen the tie with a piece of ribbon or silk rope to create a draped effect. A simple but clean bow makes the best statement for your tieback here. For bench shape seating, the same method can be employed, but use a long rectangle of cloth. For extra flair, cut slits up both on the front and back of the fabric once it has been draped, every 14 inches. Collect the segments front and back and tie with ribbon or rope.

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Layer your entry hall tables, start with the cloth and choose colors that will complement your event theme. Creamy white and champagne tones are timelessly elegant and go with almost any occasion or color scheme. Adding a table runner over the top of the cloth gives depth and texture. Use multiple centerpieces. A single large centerpiece of a long cafeteria table can look clumsy and off-balance, in addition to hindering the perception of the guests in the middle. Employing numerous smaller nodes helps to break up the huge amount of the table long and adds points of interest to the guests along its length. Every 3 to 4 feet makes for a good distance.